Capitol Hill fallout is indicative of the swollen powers wielded in Silicon Valley

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Jing Xi Lau on Unsplash

When conspiracy theorists in horned helmets stormed Capitol Hill, it hammered home the extent of the societal divide in the United States. Having been lead astray by ‘Q Anon’ accounts on the internet, a number of people broke in, in the belief that they were saving the country from a satanic cult. Trump himself has leaned into this, because he’s a narcissist and he knew it would bring in votes.

Five people died, including a police officer and a young woman who was shot at point blank range by an officer. …


Radical ‘Act For The Freedom To Express One’s Views And Obtain And Disseminate Information On The Internet’.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Proriat Hospitality on Unsplash

There are a huge array of opinions when it comes to freedom of expression and the duty of social media companies to facilitate it. This reality is now manifesting itself in related laws implemented by nation-states. Canada and the United Kingdom seem to be moving towards a situation in which they would fine companies like Facebook for failing to remove content deemed inappropriate. …


Gabbard and Gosar lead the bipartisan fight against the technocracy

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Prateek Katyal on Unsplash

We are seemingly on the precipice of making seismic changes in the way we allow Big Tech to operate within our society. The issue of censorship and the debates about the flow of information are bringing people from all over the political spectrum together.

In the United States Democratic representative and presidential contender Tulsi Gabbard has joined forces with Republican Paul Gosar to introduce the ‘Break Up Big Tech Act of 2020’ — or BUBTA.

Gabbard’s website states that the bill is designed to ‘Remove legal immunity from Big Tech’ companies who ‘Engage in certain manipulative practices, including acting as publishers and censoring certain users’. As it stands, companies like Facebook and Twitter can curate the information that billions of people see. This gives them enormous influence; whilst they remain free of responsibility for the content that they promote. …


Democratic Veteran Supports Trump’s Condemnation of Section 230

Image for post
Image for post

As it currently stands, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act ensures that ‘No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider’. The problem is that companies like Facebook and Twitter are essentially the modern equivalent of the public square. They host the vast majority of digital discussions. They are also able to exclude and censor whoever they want on a whim. They decide what is acceptable discourse and who is allowed to partake in debate. …


Leading us into the surveillance state dystopia where employers trade worker’s metadata

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by NASA on Unsplash

This year we have experienced a historic shift towards remote work. This could, potentially, be a liberating and revolutionary change. However, as the lines between labour and leisure time-space become increasingly blurred, we encounter a host of new problems to solve. We would all accept the reality of a boss observing a worker in the office, but the notion of an employer having eyes and ears on an employee outside of the workspace is somewhat disturbing. When does a remote worker clock out?

Keeping employee track records is not new. To make someone ‘Employee of the month’, logically there must be some kind of data comparisons going on. Things are different now though. Rather than the eye test or judgements of character made by employers previously, workers are now subject to intense scrutiny. The sheer amount of worker data being captured, archived and traded makes the contemporary process of employee comparison rather inhumane and frankly dystopian. …


We are witnessing the bipartisan repression of criticism of corrupt pharmaceutical corporations

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash

The blatant corruption of the Tory party has taken centre stage this year, and rightly so. Boris Johnson and his goons have shamelessly used the Covid-19 pandemic as an opportunity to transfer public money to their friends and pharmaceutical corporations. It has been a total disgrace but, sadly, hardly a shock to the system. Thankfully, the UK has a fantastic two-party system which guarantees a staunch opposition to the cronyism and depravity of the Conservatives, right?

Nope.

The Labour party has set it’s stall out, and it’s not pretty. Despite being lead by Keir Starmer, a supposed expert in human rights, it seems that the party would rather crack down on freedom of expression than have the integrity of Big Pharma questioned. …


Whistleblowers and Project Veritas versus Legacy Media and Big Tech

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Markus Gjengaar on Unsplash

If Donald Trump is who we know him to be, then the 2020 election isn’t going to be over until the Supreme Court says it is. There’s a good chance Trump’s claims of fraud will dismissed and he’ll be ejected from the White House. He would be, as he would say, a total loser. However, the sheer number of people making claims about potential cheating warrants investigation. Even if you believe there is a 0% chance of a Trump victory in court, you should encourage the procedure to be followed for the sake of people’s faith in Democracy. …


Oregonians pass Drug Decriminalization and Addiction Treatment Initiative with 59% approval

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Cas Holmes on Unsplash

Otherwise known as Ballot Measure 110, Oregon’s newest drug law is at the tip of the spear in the fight back against the War on Drugs. It is the first American state to decriminalize the possession of all drugs. The maximum fine for drug possession has been capped at $100. Those who cannot, or choose not to pay the fine can agree to complete a ‘Health assessment’ at an addiction recovery center. This signifies an end to the profiteering of addiction. Oregonians have voted against the incarceration of innocent civilians who choose to indulge. …


Journalist forced to resign from his own company following censorship

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Julius Drost on Unsplash

A hypothetical graph mapping the strain of the culture wars on society would pinpoint 2020 as an undeniable vertex. People are perhaps more divided than they ever have been. Nearly every major issue seems to cut society in half as we fall into ridiculous and unalterable dichotomies.

Mention the fact that Joe Biden is a corrupt politician? You’ll be labelled a Trumper and by extension a racist… obviously.

What? You think that everyone should have a roof over their head and food on the table? You God damn Commie bastard!

Oh, you question the notion of governments putting entire nations on de facto house arrest in the name of public health? …


How the Military Industrial Complex and Intelligence Community are tearing the fabric of society

Image for post
Image for post
@Millie__Weaver

To digest this article and ShadowGate 2 properly, it will be important to have a good understanding of things like IIA’s (Interactive Internet Activities) and the commercial equivalent, Shadownet. If you have not seen ShadowGate or read my review of the first instalment, I would recommend doing so. The links are at the bottom of this article.

The sequel to Millie Weaver’s ground breaking documentary ShadowGate sees the return of decorated veteran and whistleblower Patrick Bergy, who introduces part two with a somber warning about the third world war — ‘The cyber war’. …

About

The Joe de Vivre

Freedom Writer.⌛️

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store